Public Relations 8/Sculpting Space, Social Choreography

Please click this link to view artworks by IADT BA (Hons) students at IMMA

https://base1artiadt.wordpress.com/space-place/on-site/

3.jpg 1-1.jpg 21.jpg onsite91.png

onsite121.png onsite171.png

IADT BA (Hon) Students at IMMA

51z1mjtvvxl-_sx362_bo1204203200_.jpg

crocheted-environment.jpg

Womb Room 1995 (Crocheted Environment) by Artist Faith Wilding for the exhibition “Division of Labour: Women’s Work in Contemporary Art” at the Bronx Museum.

945d80_f5a301b908ad45969080d2b531c5ba60mv1.jpg

Collaborative Learning for Physical Prowess (on the dance floor): How to Dance Like a Boss & The People’s (dance) Party Jens Hauge & Renee Sills with guest presenters Leif J. Lee, Tonisha Toler, and Padraic O’Meara (Source: http://www.kevinjesuino.com)

This was a two part project.

The first. Have you ever wanted to learn to do a specific type of dance but were to afraid to go take a dance class because of the possibility of failing or looking like a goof? In Renee Sills & Jens Hauge “Collaborative Learning for Physical Prowness (on the dance floor): How to Dance Like a Boss” three non-professional dancers were asked to research and present their favourite “How to Dance” YouTube videos and teach the group of participants the steps. Everyone started off like wall-flowers glued to their chairs. No one wanted to be at the front of the dance class. But after some great engagement and hosting skills by Jens Hauge the room was full of people watching YouTube videos and mimicking everyone from country line dances to house, lyrical ballet to MC Hammer. It was ridiculous and mesmerizing to see so many people doing the same choreography and also looking as ridiculous and memorized by YouTube videos as I was.

The second. What makes a great party? Renee Sills spent months investigating and asking people this question. For this culminating event she brought all the elements necessary to have the best party of the world! And it sure was! A good sound system, good music, good lighting, a disco ball, a good dance floor, fun people, costumes, free water, free snacks, and even free booze. It was the perfect recipe to let loose and see how far everyone could go in shaking their booty. If I remember one thing from this entire festival, it is that parties make the best social art practice events if done right. Thanks to all those who danced and danced and danced that evening. (Source: http://www.kevinjesuino.com)

Rick Lowe, Project Row Houses

04_14_fe_social_rick_lowe_600.jpg

Photo by Eric Hester, ARTNEWS: Project Row Houses, Rick Lowe

Article: How the Art of Social Practice is Changing the World, One Row House at a Time 

Joseph Beuys, SOCIAL SCULPTURE

Joseph Beuys (1921-1986) was a German sculptor, performance artist, educator and activist who promoted the idea of art as a transformational force that could reshape society through creative projects undertaken by an active citizenship. He believed that each person could express an artistic desire to change the world and make it a better place. Beuys considered everyone to be an artist. Each person had the potential to create not just objets of art, but experiences and situations that unleashed their artistry within society at large (or the transformation of everyday environments).

“Social sculpture” is a term promoted by the German artist Joseph Beuys through a series of very public lecture tours beginning in the early 1970s. It named a kind of artwork that takes place in the social realm, an art that requires social engagement, the participation of its audience, for its completion. For Beuys, the concept was infused with both political intention and spiritual values. As spectators became participants he believed…social sculpture would lead to a transformation of society through the release of popular creativity. (Reference Alan W. Moore, ‘A Brief Genealogy of Social Sculpture,’ Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, http://www.joaap.org)

An example of a social sculpture initiated by Beuys was 7 000 Oaks This was a five year project completed after the the death of Beuys, which involved the planting of 7 000 trees throughout the German city of Kassel. The trees were individually and collectively a sculpture that influenced city spaces and the city environment. The trees were planted by volunteers who also developed conversations about social planning.

tumblr_mwkwubodds1smmiwoo1_12801.jpg